Shape Your Mobile & Cloud Strategy Join Me @VMworld Barcelona

 Barcelona-Spain-8-480x317

VMworld Europe will bring together individuals and entities from 92 different nations to share and compare the latest in virtualization technology developments, innovations, solutions, and directions. Since technology adoption varies from country to country, it will be interesting to learn how the adoption and implementation of VMware technology and products affects organizations virtualization data center transformation strategies and their journey to the hybrid cloud.

Vmworld 2014

This is my 10th VMworld all of them in fabulous cities including San Francisco, Cannes, and Copenhagen. This spring I joined Capgemini from EMC to lead our partnership with the EMC Federation of companies; EMC II, VMware, Pivotal, and RSA. Moving from a product company to a services organization has been a big change for me, a good one for all, and one that brings trusted relationships and a shared vision for what is possible for our partnership and customers.

2010EMCWorldvSpec

VMworld is an important event for Capgemini’s collaboration with VMware.  There are three major strategic initiatives for our partnership: 1. Software defined data center (SDDC) with Service Integration, 2. SAP Hana on vSphere, and 3. Enterprise Mobility (AirWatch). A few key points about these strategic initiatives and the impact to our partnership and customers from Patrick Nicolet Capgemini CEO Infrastructure Services and Group Board Member:

Patrick Nicolet Capgemini CEO Infrastructure Services and Group Board Member @VMorld San Francisco 2014

Software Defined Data Center – Service Integration

Service Integration helps clients remove the complexity of IT transformation through the aggregation of services orchestration and management capabilities.  In 2013, Capgemini established our services integration partnership with VMware through the executive sponsorship of Pat Gelsinger (VMware CEO) and Patrick Nicolet (Capgemini CEO Infrastructure Services and Group Board Member).  Both are visionaries and committed to co-innovation, having had the forethought to  develop our first  offering, Services Integration founded on VMware’s ITBM technology and Capgemini customer knowledge and intimacy. This offering resulted in Capgemini receiving 2 awards this year: VMware’s Consulting and Integration Partner of the Year, and Hybrid Cloud Innovation joint award with one of our clients at vForum in Paris on June 4 2014. 

 

Harish Rao Capgemini Infrastructure Services CTO discusses managing enabling servces orchestration @VMworld 2014

SAP Hana on vSphere

In May of 2014, as part of Pat Gelsinger’s keynote presentation at EMC World,  Patrick Nicolet announced another level of our partnership: a three-way go to market play with VMware and SAP for the deployment of Hana in highly virtualized environments.  In June, in recognition of its outstanding contributions as an SAP partner, Capgemini received a 2014 SAP® Pinnacle award as the SAP HANA® Adoption Partner of the Year. SAP Pinnacle awards are presented annually to the top SAP partners that have excelled in developing and growing their partnership with SAP and driving customer success.  

Cindy Borgman Capgemini VP Infrastructure Services Global Operations, SAP Business discusses partnership with SAP and VMware and the value for customers

Enterprise Mobility with AirWatch

Building on a foundation of earlier successes, on September 9th Capgemini and VMware announced the expansion of our strategic partnership centered around enterprise mobility management and end-user computing, More specifically, the partnership allows us to leverage AirWatch’s Enterprise Managed Mobility solution as we bundle it with our Mobile Solutions service offerings.  At VMworld Barcelona you will have a chance to hear from Fernando Alaverz, Capgemini Senior Vice President and Head of the Mobile Solutions Global Service Line.  Fernando has said, “For Capgemini, the bigger picture includes positioning its mobile divisions around the internet of things and corresponding data and analytics, which he called “the next big thing.”  So don’t miss Fernando’s keynote at VMworld on Wednesday, October 16th at 16:30.

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Now in its third consecutive year in Barcelona, VMworld offers an attractive venue to bring together diverse cultures for sharing, comparing, and collaboration.  Barcelona is a city rich in culture and history, offering a picturesque waterfront site to stimulate minds and imaginations alike. 

Join me and the leadership team of Capgemini in Barcelona where we are once again proud and honored to be a VMworld CIP (Consulting & Integration Partner) Platinum sponsor.

Learn more about disruptions and innovations with partners in this video with Lanny Cohen, Capgemini Corporate Chief Technology Officer.

Student Innovation: Changing the World

Hult Prize Inspires Cross Cultural Leaders to Unite While Building Communities of Social Change

Students Kick Off The Day

Students Kick Off The Day

Can we build a social healthcare enterprise that serves the needs of 25 million slum dwellers suffering from chronic diseases by 2019?  This was the Challenge put forth by President Clinton and Hult Prize to students from around the world.  The Hult Prize is a global competition and start-up accelerator for budding young social entrepreneurs emerging from the world’s universities. Named as one of the top five ideas changing the world by President Bill Clinton and TIME Magazine, the annual competition for the Hult Prize aims to identify and launch the most compelling social business ideas—start-up enterprises that tackle grave issues faced by billions of people.

President Bill Clinton

President Bill Clinton at Hult Prize Finals 2013

More than 11,000 applications were received, but only 300 start-ups selected to present ideas to judges at the 6 regional competitions held this past weekend (March 7-8, 2014) in Boston, Dubai, London, San Francisco, Sao Paulo and Shanghai.  Although inspired by the experience of responding to this challenge, students are also motivated by the award of $1,000,000 in seed capital to the winners, as well as mentorship and advice from the international business community in an intensive six-week Social Enterprise Accelerator held at IXL-Center in Boston.

Faces of Students

Faces of Students at Final Judging in San Francisco

A key part of the story, and the power of Hult Prize is answering the social enterprise challenge each year impacting the world, this year seeking solutions to improve chronic disease healthcare in slums.  Another part of the story is about the effect and gratification of being a judge.

The Judges

The Judges Team 2, Andreas Raptopoulos, CEO Matternet; Chris Stacy, Director IDEO, Sheryl Chamberlain, EMC; Lacy Caruthers, Principal Google;  Chris S. Thomas, Chief Strategist Intel

The judges are a diverse group of people from the ranks of corporate CXOs, non-profit leaders and social entrepreneurs.  When they participate as judges they join an extensive community established by Hult Prize and their partners:  Hult International Business School, Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) and IXL Center.  Many of us have never met before, yet we come together as a working team at the regional championships.  In total approximately 1,200 entrepreneurs spend an estimated 1.4 Million Man Hours on Hult Prize.  Each of us is changed forever by being instrumental in helping to launch the next wave of social entrepreneurs.

Aspire, Hult Prize 2013 winning team from Canada's McGill University

Aspire, Hult Prize 2013 winning team from Canada’s McGill University

Last year I participated in the Boston regionals where the Challenge was to end world hunger. At the time, the United Nations estimated over 870 Million people in the urban slums are uncertain of food sustainability.  The 2013 Hult Prize winning team from McGill University, now a start-up posed to tackle this challenge head-on, was team Aspire. Their game changing idea?  Insects (see my blog Cricket Flour Power Wins 2013 Hult Prize).

Judges Team 3, The Winning Team

Judges Team 3, The Winning Team

This year I was local, participating in the San Francisco regionals, with a group of 25 judges separated into 4 groups.  Each group spent the day listening to pitches and deliberating as a team to select a group winner.  Then all of us together, competitive, rowdy, and filled with passion agreed on the regional champion, MIT’s Wi Care.  Their start-up concept – the Wound Pump. When left untreated wounds can become infected lead to death.  This is true everywhere in the world, but especially in the slums.  It will be interesting to see how their winning idea matures and flourishes after they spend the summer at the Hult Prize Accelerator in Boston.

MIT Wi-Care

San Francisco Regionals Winning Team:  MIT Wi Care

So you have a good sense of what it is like to be a judge I asked my fellow judges to share a quote about their personal experience. Team 3, MIT’s Wi Care was the winning idea.

Team 1 UPenn Nexus

Kate O'Keefe Cisco, Dorian Stone McKinsey, Terri Mandel BioMedLink

Kate O’Keefe Cisco, Dorian Stone McKinsey, Terry Mandel BioMedLink

The Nexus team’s plan is aimed at providing cheap but first-world quality drugs to slum dwellers by (1) remotely diagnosing underserved slum dwellers via SMS, and (2) redirecting currently wasted near-expiration drugs from the U.S. and selling it at low cost to local clinics.  Terry Mandel, colleague, friend, healthcare leader, and CEO BioMedlink, “While their proposals covered a wide range of ideas, viability, and market readiness, the teams universally displayed a passion for, and commitment to, reducing human suffering through sustainable business innovation. I found out later that the UPenn team we advanced for their plan to stock Indian health clinics with first-world pharmaceutical drug “waste” comprised all undergraduates! Like the other teams, they were keen for feedback and mentoring to move their idea towards proof of concept.”

Team 2, My Team Monterey Institute of International Studies (one of many all women teams)

Monterey Institute of International Studies

Monterey Institute of International Studies

This all women team impressed me through their focus on solving high blood pressure, by targeting remittances and creating a partnership with local community healthcare workers. A two fold idea creating jobs while solving the issues associated with high blood pressure. I asked Chris S. Thomas who was the judge quote king for the day, succinctly summarizing each pitch with a pithy quote, for his impressions. At the end of the experience:  “Incredible rapid fire pipeline of quality ideas and innovative teams.  It was like “Speed Dating 4 Innovation” with the judges arguing over who to take home.”  Chris S. Thomas 
Chief Strategist 
Director of Architecture 
World Ahead 
Intel Corporation.

Team 3, the WinningTeam MIT Wi Care

Markus Fromherz, Xerox Chief Innovation Officer, Healthcare

Markus Fromherz, Xerox Chief Innovation Officer, Healthcare

Markus Fromherz, the Xerox Chief Innovation Officer, Healthcare said, “The MIT team demonstrated unusual insight and commitment to their chosen problem, open-wound care. The solution included not just a novel, safer, and easier-to-use device with proven business model based on their field work, but also addressed aspects like the local manufacturability and care-giver training to make this a successful social enterprise.”

Team 4 Hult International Business School

Hult International Business School

Hult International Business School

Introducing Hult at the regional finals was Kate O’Keefe, Chief Innovation Officer at Cisco.  Talking about powerful women committed to changing the world, Kate a recent Sydney/Bay Area transplant received standing applause, during her deliberations.

Kate O'Keefe Cisco, Hitendra Patel Ph.D, Managing Director of the IXL Center

Kate O’Keefe Chief Innovation Officer, Cisco; Hitendra Patel Ph.D, Managing Director of the IXL Center

“It was a privilege to be a judge for the Hult Prize, to be involved for just a moment in the incredible journey these social entrepreneurs from schools all over the world have been on… What impressed me most was that none of these teams were there to build businesses to enrich themselves – they were all there to enrich the lives of the world’s poor through addressing chronic illness.” Kate O’Keefe, Cisco.

Mike Leisher, GM GE Healthcare; Liz Maw, CEO Netimpact; Hugh Molotsti,VP Intuit Labs; Ki

Mike Leisher, GM GE Healthcare; Liz Maw, CEO Netimpact; Hugh Molotsti,VP Intuit Labs

Recounting the entire day’s experience, Hugh Molotsi, Vice President, Intuit Labs Incubator at Intuit.   “It was a long day rewarding day with lots of impressive teams.  MIT’s Wi Care team came out on top but I hope many other teams keep going.”  Fellow judge and blogger Shahid Kahn Innovation Evangelist & Coach at PayPal said, “One thing that lit my fire is that these young women and men could empathize with the poor living in slums, while they are from a completely different background. Check Shahid Khan’s blog on the Hult San Francisco Regionals.  Lacy Caruthers, Principal at Google said:   “The Hult Prize excels at finding and supporting the best and brightest entrepreneurs globally. I was blown away by the creativity and drive of the teams here, and look forward to seeing many of these ideas in action.”

Hitendra Patel, Ph.D. Managing Director of the IXL Center, Professor of Innovation & Growth, Hult IBS

Hitendra Patel, Ph.D. Managing Director of the IXL Center, Professor of Innovation & Growth, Hult IBS

After the program I had a chance to catch up with Hitendra Patel, Ph.D and Managing Director of the IXL Center.  Hitendra and Ron Jonash Senior Partner at the IXL Center both Hult International Business School Faculty wrote the Challenge in partnership with CGI and Hult. Hitendra said, the students answer the challenge completely on their own, and offered us a Challenge to work with the students, so they too can incubate their idea.

Sheryl Chamberlain Hult Prize San Francisco Judge
Sheryl Chamberlain Hult Prize San Francisco Judge

So, how are you going to change the world?  Is the time right for you to work with the students, and help them on this amazing journey? I invite you to join our community committed to social innovation and entrepreneurship.  Together, I am confident we can make a difference. Learn more about this year’s regional winners at Hult Prize 2014 Six Finalists and look for my post on the Hult Prize finals coming this September. 

the tent

Getting Back In The Game

I believe that women represent a tremendous, untapped resource that has produced and will continue to yield huge returns for organizations and the communities they support. Through the power of women’s entrepreneurial activity, we create growth and prosperity while driving solutions for business and social problems. We, in partnership with men, are now a driving force of entrepreneurial growth and leading real, fundamental economic change that is reshaping the world. That’s why I said YES, when Johanna Wise invited me to be the morning keynote at the inaugural Connect•Work•Thrive Conference.

Sheryl Chamberlain and Johanna Wise Connect Work Thrive Conference Founder

Sheryl Chamberlain and Johanna Wise Founder of Refresh Your Career: Connect Work Thrive

“The goal of the conference is to provide job seekers, who are returning to work after a career break or looking to make a career change, with practical tools and advice to better market themselves in the fast-changing Bay Area marketplace,” said Refresh Your Career:  Connect•Work•Thrive Founder Johanna Wise.  The conference target audience is men, women and employers.

I was joined by fellow keynote speaker Vivian Steir Rabin CoFounder iLaunch who said “The longer you’re away from work, the more you need to determine whether your interests and skills have changed.  For those who weren’t terribly happy in their jobs before they took a break, this is all the more important. For those people, the break is a gift.”  Vivian is the co-author of the acclaimed career reentry strategy book Back on the Career Track: A Guide for Stay-at-Home Moms Who Want to Return to Work and the co-founder of career reentry programming company iRelaunch. iRelaunch’s signature product is the iRelaunch Return to Work Conference, which has attracted nearly 3,000 attendees across the US and in London.  After attending Vivian’s workshop it was clear Vivian inspired Johanna, me and all the lives she touches.

Vivian Steir Rabin Co-Founder iRelaunch

Vivian Steir Rabin Co-Founder iRelaunch

Feedback from Brenda Bernstein, Founder and Senior Editor and event speaker, “My favorite moment of the day was in my Traversing the Resume Gap workshop. I put a section of one of the participant’s resumes up on the screen and asked for feedback from the group on how he could better leverage his experience as a “stay-at-home dad.” The feedback and suggestions from the group were amazing! Spot-on and exactly what was needed. This exchange was a testament to the quality of the attendees. I hope they are able to continue to support each other into the future!”  Brenda Bernstein is the Author of the Best-Selling e-book, How to Write a KILLER LinkedIn Profile… and 18 Mistakes to Avoid

Brenda Bernstein Author

Brenda Bernstein Author

Participant at Sara Ellis Conant session titled Having it All: Combining a Meaningful Career with the Relationships You Desire said, “I loved your workshop yesterday on “Having it All”.  The presentation really resonated with me as a working mother with a beautiful six and two year old and constantly feeling torn between two worlds.  I am not usually a tactile/visual type of person but I am planning on filling a jar with my priorities (rocks and pebbles) and putting it in my home as a reminder to listen to my heart and also to bring me back when things get out of balance.”

Sara Ellis Conant

Sara Ellis Conant

Before speaking at the program Karen Burke, Director of Connect•Work•Thrive Public Relations interviewed me about my personal brand and qualities employers are looking for in their job candidates, why collaboration is key to a successful and fulfilling work, life, and the focus of my upcoming keynote entitled, “Burnish Your Brand – Using Your Best Talents More Often”.

Sheryl Chamberlain Interview with CWT (Connect Work Thrive)

Sheryl Chamberlain Interview with CWT (Connect Work Thrive)

CWT: What do you hope will be your presentation’s key takeaways for conference attendees?

A: There are many ways to be a successful leader in the world. By giving examples of leaders, some of whom are not well-known [have not had the spotlight focused on them] who achieved success by executing against their vision, I hope to inspire audience members that they too can make a career doing something they love.  Essentially, burnishing, or polishing, your brand will provide the path for you to be more successful more often.  I also want to encourage attendees to use their success to help the next generation of leaders and innovators.

CWT: What is a “personal brand?” Are there any specific “brand” qualities employers are looking for when hiring candidates in today’s job market?

A: My brand is being an agent of change.  In every situation, I think creatively to develop new solutions to problems and, at the same time, engage leaders from every level in the organization as partners in the plan.  To do this, I combine business acumen and process to execute on strategic initiatives while fostering trust and building partnerships.  I routinely involve myself in multiple work streams while staying focused on my individual objectives and delivering results.  A big part of my brand is providing support and development opportunities for members of my team and my partners, and recognizing them for their contributions.

Today organizations are looking for individuals who are not afraid to challenge the status quo, but understand they must be part of the solution.  While it is important to have a social media footprint, it must be one that adds value to you and your organization. I would add, learning on the job is acceptable as long as you have positive energy and fresh ideas.

CWT: In the past, you have talked about the importance of collaboration and developing a community to achieve success in both work and personal life. Why is this important?

A: My good friend Kare Anderson, Emmy Award Winning Journalist and Forbes columnist is committed to building a world that is better together, one of our shared passions.  When we live a life where we work together with and for each other in our work, personal interests, and social life, we will live better, more impactful lives. Results can be achieved in three ways:

Kare Anderson

Sheryl Chamberlain and Kare Anderson

1) Use our best talents more often

2) Grow your circle of friendships

3) Be part of something larger than ourselves while recognizing the possibility and power of unintentional allies.

CWT:  As a successful corporate executive at EMC Corporation, what gets you most excited about coming to work every day?

A: I get up every day, knowing I have two jobs: 1. Identify new opportunities for creating local and global communities of leadership and innovation and 2. Lead Industry Standards and Open Source Strategy in my role within the Office of the CTO. Together these two passions give me the energy and drive to come to work for EMC every day.

CWT: Can you name some men and women who have inspired you throughout your career?

A: I am surrounded by amazing executives at EMC, VMware and VCE many of whom have held out their hand of support freely. They include Pat Gelsinger, VMware CEO; Frank Hauck, VCE President; Joel Schwartz, EMC SVP; Dan Campbell, EMC SVP; Helene Barnekow, EMC SVP.  But when I consider the work I have done in the community, there are two people that stand out: Rayona Sharpnack, Founder & President Institute for Women’s Leadership and Linda Alepin Founder and CEO Global Women’s Leadership Network and 2013 Eleanor Roosevelt Fund Award Winner  Both of these women have committed their lives to changing the world and have created leadership programs to train and support women to achieve ground breaking results.

Linda Alepin, Eleanor Roosevelt Award Winner

Linda Alepin, Eleanor Roosevelt Fund Award Winner

This past week I had an opportunity to reflect on the power of this conference, and impact on the employers and attendees.  Employers which included EMC Corporation, Stanford Graduate School, Bain & Company, Yale Silicon Valley Club, and Gleam had an opportunity to share successful back-to-work approaches in today’s job market while networking with on-site with local firms.  Additionally, Pam Fox Rollin delivered a session called “Onboarding Executives:  Grasping The Opportunity to More Senior Teams Forward”.  Pam an Executive Coach, IdeaShape regularly facilitates senior leadership team workshops shared tips from her book 42 Rules for Your New Leadership Role

Johanna met her goal to provide job seekers, who are returning to work after a career break with practical tools to better market themselves in the fast-changing Bay Area marketplace.  But most important attendees had an opportunity to:

  • Assess personal skills and determine applicable careers
  • Address the gap years on a resume and during job interviews
  • Determine necessary job search resources and how to leverage them to get a job
  • Maintain confidence during job search and dress for success
  • Identify and reach powerful job networks
Employers attending Pam Fox Rollin's session

Employers attending Pam Fox Rollin’s session

I look forward to staying connected to this community led by Johanna Wise, while helping men and women get back into the game, finding employment, and refreshing their career.

You can learn more about this Johanna Wise and Connect Work Thrive by going to these links:  In The NewsAbout Connect Work Thrive,  SponsorsCWT on Facebook .

Leadership Lessons – Advice From Women of Influence

On October 16, 2013 I had the great honor to lead “A Day of Excellence Through Leadership”, a full day program and a sponsored by the New England Diversity Council and led by Ameerah Mukayed.  The program is an annual event which brings together a diverse mix of successful women leaders who discuss topics pertinent to today’s workforce in order to educate, inspire, and encourage attendees to reflect as they strive to advance within their organizations. The panel sessions were moderated by my EMC colleague and friend Stacy Schaeffer and myself. Panel topics included:  Becoming a Person of Influence in the Workplace and Community, Perceptions of Assertive Women, Winning at Office Politics, Prepping for a Position of Power,  Maintaining Your Value During Shaky Economic Times.

Leadership Panel

Left to right, Carrie Webb, Stacy Schaeffer, Ritu Jyoti, Sheryl Chamberlain, Stephanie Sonnabend, Juliette Mayers and Danielle Duplin

Our five panelists had a broad range of experience covering different industries, cultural backgrounds, and points of view. Panelists were Danielle Duplin, VP & Executive Program Director at Fidelity Investments; Stephanie Sonnabend, Former President & CEO, Sonesta International Hotel Corporation Founder & Chair, 2020 Women on Boards; Carrie Webb Olson, Partner, Day Pitney LLP;  RItu Jyoti, VP Product Management, startup Kaminario; and Juliette Mayers, Executive Director of Multicultural Marketing, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts.

The panelists shared their thoughts on this event in this short video: 

Chandra Jacobs, BRS Marketing shared her perspectives on the day in her Blog, which, to be honest, is a must read post.  Another one of my guests,  Blessing Chiedza Chimbindi shared her leadership lessons with the audience also.  I was so impressed by Blessings reflections I wanted to share her learnings with a broader community of leaders .  As you read through Chandra and Blessing’s posts, remember these are examples of how we, as leaders of our current generation, have the opportunity to support the next generation of leaders.  As women of influence our leadership lessons have the potential impact to last a lifetime. 

Blessing Chiedza Chimbindi-Entrepreneurial, Innovative, Masters in International Business, BSc Computer Information Systems

I have written this to document the key lessons I attain from various women in leadership. Growing up, I was continuously selected for leadership positions. I even earned leadership scholarships in college and graduate school. However I have always viewed leadership to be something that can’t be built overnight, it takes time and an intentional pursuit of evolving in leadership. I am naturally passionate about learning, and being a leader is a continuum of learning and growing.

Women in leadership symposium

I had the privilege to attend the Women in Leadership Symposium. I am grateful to Sheryl Chamberlain from EMC who invited me to the event. Here are some of the key lessons I learnt from the symposium.

Becoming a person of influence in the workplace and community

There are three types of computer engineers

1) Has a problem and no solution.
2) Has a problem and three alternatives.
3) Has a problem, three alternatives and choses one of the alternatives and explain the outcome.

Make your own opportunity, be entrepreneurial and bring solutions to the table.

My Reflection

Being influential comes with being valuable. Demonstrate the value you bring by being solution and results driven, taking initiative and thinking critically. I really liked the panelist who mentioned that even if you do an excellent job you don’t have to tone it down to make other people around you feel better. Being a leader whether male or female requires that you rise above the status quo and motivate others to do so. Leaders are trendsetters and that is what sets them apart, they lead by example. By doing so you influence change and you impact the community around you.

Besides the more we all do well and strive for excellence, the better the

a) company brand becomes
b) products/services become
c) customer satisfaction increases

Perceptions of an assertive woman

Three tips on how to be nice

1) Listen: Listen with your ears and your eyes.
2) Develop relationships: Ask people about themselves and continue to be supportive.
3) Lead by example: Engage with people of all levels

This creates a culture of caring

Three tips on how to be assertive

1) Speak up: Participate, volunteer for high profile projects, self -promote, acknowledge compliments
2) Develop a strategic plan (personal and professional). Start with your passion and define the skills and resources you need for pursuing your passion.
3) Have thick skin: Be subtle and expand. Let go and focus on the bigger picture. If your point is dismissed but listened to when another counterpart states the same point you could respond saying, “As I said before”
 Continue being assertive but also continue to be nice.
 Don’t participate in trashing other employees
 Do your own work well. Believe in your idea.
 Stay focused and don’t be hungry for a pat on the back.

My Reflection

At the beginning I perceived myself as a nice person and after the panelist described the ways of an assertive person I saw myself fitting into that as well. I believe assertiveness is often perceived as aggressiveness when it comes to women. I agree with the panelist who said that it is important to be assertive and nice. I also agree that one should not be focused and so hungry for getting a pat on the back, the overall goal is what matters.

Winning at office politics

 Make people feel valued and respected.
 Make time to understand other people rather than competing to be understood.
 Be trusted (don’t gossip). Be well liked and be able to move other people.
 Be well connected to the informer and influencer
o Informer – the person who tells you what is really happening.
o Influencer – the person whose opinions are highly valued.

Build alliances

My Reflection

Office politics can be tricky. This topic really appealed to me. I recall my mentor who once visited me at work and he told me that he admired how I don’t gossip and how trustworthy I am. At the time I didn’t know that it was such a valuable characteristic to have. It is one of the core components that help in winning office politics. Although these values are driven by my faith, they bring added value in my professional life.

Prepping for a position in power

Forms of power

Charisma Information Relationships (politics)

Authority Expertise Reputation

 Add value to your corporation: Your ideas and tasks should be aligned and supportive of the corporation’s vision.
 Communicate your work: It is critical for people to know the ideas you pioneer. You could do so through a memo, presentation of the ideaDon’t let your promotion pass you by.

My Reflection

As women we do work hard but make ourselves passive in communicating our value and work. This section really helped me find my voice and be more outspoken about my efforts.
I also learned that being intentional in aligning your efforts with the vision of the organization yields both individual and organizational success. Just like it is in science, the head contains the brain that controls signals in the whole body. Information is sent to and from the brain. That is where information is processed, the brain understands the body. So when you demonstrate that you understand the vision and implement your tasks with that knowledge, it is easier for you to be seen as someone who can be the ‘brain’ of the company.

Maintaining your value during shaky economic times

 Don’t be stagnant. Update yourself.
 Seek opportunities to network and grow.
 Be excellent at what you do and maintain your competitive edge.

My Reflection

As I am seeking for a job, I ensure that I sharpen my skills. I do Java programming exercises at Codecademy to brush up my coding skills. Even in transition it is important to stay ahead and be proactive about polishing up your skills and adding value to maintain your competitive edge.

Cricket Flour Power Wins 2013 Hult Prize

President Bill Clinton

President Bill Clinton

The Hult Prize competition is a challenge to business school students from around the world to develop a feasible plan to solve a global problem while creating a viable, scalable business at the same time.  Endorsed by President Clinton’s Global Initiative, the program is founded on an endowment for an annual million-dollar prize, which is used by the winning team to launch their new social enterprise.  Equally important, all of the finalists receive a full one-year membership into the Clinton Global Initiative and support from its members to continue to develop their social business ideas.

Hult Prize CGI Award Dinner

Hult Prize CGI Award Dinner

The Hult competition has taken on huge social issues – education, housing and the water crisis. Through crowdsourcing, training, mentorship, and funding, the competition seeks to launch the next wave of social entrepreneurs. This year, student teams were selected from over 11,000 applicants representing 350 colleges and universities to pitch their innovative social ventures for solving the Global Food Crisis at one of five Regional Final events. Teams were then selected to participate in regional finals held in Boston, San Francisco, London, Dubai, Shanghai, and online. Six of these teams then won the right to attend the Hult Prize Accelerator for startups and then pitch their social business ideas to President Clinton at the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting in New York City.

The world’s largest student competition for social good chose the global food crisis because while the world produces enough food to feed everyone, more than 1/3 is lost or wasted.  While this is not a new problem and is believed to be the world’s most solvable challenge, still today 25% of the children in the world are hungry.   

Hult Founder and CEO of the Hult, Prize Ahmad Ashkar

Hult Founder and CEO of the Hult, Prize Ahmad Ashkar

CEO and Founder of the Hult, Prize Ahmad Ashkar, explained why feeding the world was slected as the this year’s issue in his FOX News interview.  “Food is the easiest challenge to solve in the world. It is really a concept of distribution.” According to Ashkar, the world produces enough food to feed all of its inhabitants and the key is to figure out how to shorten supply chains, make food more efficient, bring costs down and make it accessible to those living in the urban slum.   Listen to the full interview on Fox News.

Students Hult Prize Boston Finals

Students Hult Prize Boston Finals

As a judge in the Boston Finals, I was fortunate to be interviewed by Living on Earth’s Managing Producer, Helen Palmer.  We met at the reception, where Helen said “ There were no crickets to eat – but I did find one of the judges. Sheryl Chamberlain works for the EMC Corporation, and she said it had been hard to choose a winner.”  Here is an excerpt from that interview that was played on NPR this summer.

CHAMBERLAIN: That was the hardest part. It was listening to these amazing young people that have creative ideas and new ways of solving this problem that we’re looking at, making sure we can feed the world. It’s so hard to decide who should come first and make a decision.

PALMER: In the end, Chamberlain said, all the judges agreed on the McGill team and their small cricket farms in the slums.

CHAMBERLAIN: So the idea of taking crickets and using them for a food source going forward, farming those crickets, eating them whole, looking at different ways to use them, because they give protein in a different way that we have not considered before. So it’s really innovative and watch out – there’ll be crickets flying around your town, and we’ll be grabbing them and using them for sustainable food.  Listen to Helen Palmer’s entire interview

Peter R. Russell, Director of Corporate Relations, Hult Business School, Akanksha Hazari 2011 Hult Prize Winner & Phillip Hult Co-CEO, EF Education First

Peter R. Russell, Director of Corporate Relations, Hult Business School, Akanksha Hazari 2011 Hult Prize Winner & Phillip Hult Co-CEO, EF Education First

Impressed by my role as a judge at the Boston Regionals, Peter R. Russell, Director of Corporate Relations, Hult Business School, North America invited me to attend the Hult Prize Global Finals and Awards Dinner on September 23, 2013, where President Bill Clinton was the host at the opening event of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting in New York. The six finalists teams pitched their start-ups, in front of a world-class audience of political leaders, philanthropists, social entrepreneurs, and media luminaries. President Clinton and Muhammad Yunus along with Steve Andrews, CEO of Solar Aid, Erathrin Cousin, CEO of the World Food Program, Peter Sands, CEO of Standard Chartered Bank, Desh Deshpande, Chairman of the Deshpande Foundation, Kathy Calvin, CEO of the United Nations Foundation, and Premal Shah, Paypal co-founder and President and co-founder of Kiva, judged and selected the winner of the 2013 Hult Prize.  The award of 1 Million  USD to be used by the winning team as start-up funding, was donated by Swedish entrepreneur Bertil Hult and his family. The winning team was from Canada’s McGill  University, a Boston Regional Final, who was featured in the following day’s plenary session.

Muhammad Yunkus, 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner and 2013 Hult Prize Finals Judge

Muhammad Yunus, 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner and 2013 Hult Prize Finals Judge

Here is an overview of the winning solution in the team’s own words:

Apsire learned through research during the summer that food insecurity is not an issue of lack of food. The vast majority in urban slums do not go hungry. But they lack access to affordable nutrition. Many suffer from malnourishment and nutrient deficiencies despite being overweight or obese. Therefore, the problem of food security in urban slums is not one of food being expensive per se, but of nutritious food being unavailable or overpriced compared to cheaper, less nutritious offerings. While insects might not seem a common meal for Westerners, a new plan is being proposed by students from Montreal’s McGill University wherein edible insects can be produced at an industrial scale to provide nourishment for folks

Aspire, Hult Prize 2013 winning team from Canada's McGill University with President Clinton

Aspire, Hult Prize 2013 winning team from Canada’s McGill University with President Bill Clinton

Our disruptive social enterprise, Aspire, aims to improve access to edible insects worldwide. We develop and distribute affordable and sustainable insect farming technologies for countries with established histories of entomophagy, or insect-consumption. Our farming solutions stabilize the supply of edible insects year-round, drastically improving and expanding the economic ecosystem surrounding insect consumption in the regions serviced. Not only do our durable farming units create income stability for rural farmers, they have a wider social impact by lowering the price of edible insects. This is central to our mission of increasing access to highly nutritious edible insects amongst the poorest, and therefore neediest, members of society.

Hélène  Barnekow EMC Senior Vice President, Worldwide Field & Partner Marketing and Sheryl Chamberlain

Hélène Barnekow EMC Senior Vice President, Worldwide Field & Partner Marketing and Sheryl Chamberlain

For next year’s challenge, President Bill Clinton asks teams to build sustainable and scalable social enterprises to address non-communicable disease in slums.  I can only hope I will once again be asked to join my fellow esteemed judges at the 2014 Boston Regionals.  I would look forward to witnessing the innovative proposals for addressing President Clinton’s challenge.

Learn more:  Bugs as an edible food source. Winner’s Blog, Clinton’s Global Initiative CGI and 2014 Hult Prize Challengeprize/2014-challenge/

President Bill Clinton and Sheryl Chamberlain at 2011RSA Conference

President Bill Clinton and Sheryl Chamberlain at 2011RSA Conference

 

Women Leaders of Impact

I believe that women represent a tremendous, untapped resource that has produced and will continue to yield huge returns for organizations and the communities they support.  Through the power of women’s entrepreneurial activity, we create growth and prosperity while driving solutions for business and social problems. I am empowered and excited that now, today, the power of women’s entrepreneurship has hit a media tipping point – we, in partnership with men, are now a driving force of entrepreneurial growth and leading real, fundamental economic change that is reshaping the world.

GWLN Sisters

Global Women Leadership Network Sisters

Nowhere was this more visible than at EMC last week.  In partnership with EMC’s West Coast Women’s Leadership Forum we hosted The Leader of Impact Award 2013, which honors a Global Women’s Leadership Network (GWLN) graduate for her outstanding contributions. This, the second annual award program also recognizes their entire graduate community, a group of women who have committed their lives to changing the world while creating new opportunities for women and girls around the world. The contest celebrates the dedicated work of all GWLN graduates who are making a difference in over 40 countries. The judges including Linda Alepin, Jeff Chow, Keren Pavese, Sandya Puchalapalli and Michelle Swensen who are leaders in their own right and are to be thanked for their demanding, yet fulfilling job of selecting the five finalists with the support of GWLN graduates, friends, family and colleagues.

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EMC Diversity Leaders and LOL Award Recipient Smarita Sengupta

This year’s LOL award recipient is Smarita Sengupta, (GWLN 2010) founded the Destiny Foundation in India. Her vision is Liberation of the Sold Soul.  Her mission is to end sex trafficking and slavery through the economic empowerment of women.  The foundation employs women who are at high risk of being trafficked while living in brothels, red light areas and shelter homes. They provide them with vocational training in sewing and textiles. When girls master the skills of sewing and textiles, they are offered a position at Destiny Reflection. Through this employment, women are able to become economically self-sufficient under dignified working conditions.

Smarita Sengupta, LOI 2013

Smarita Sengupta, LOI 2013 Award Recipient

Equally empowered visionaries included the four other finalists. 1) Diti Mookherjee (GWLN 2011) – her vision is Youth Nuture Nature.  While in the U.S. as a Fulbright-Nehru Environmental Leadership Fellow, Diti attended the GWLN leadership program and conceived of the Green Rhinos Program, a global transformational youth nature leadership program.  One year later, there are more than 600 youth nature leaders known as “Green Rhinos”, including 300 girls.    2) Isha Darmy (GWLN 2011) – her vision is reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality Rates in Sierra Leone.  Supporting the community of Magbil and surrounding villages, she helped build a Health Centre and trained 42 Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) to care for women during their ante-natal, labor and post-natal periods.Ishma Darmey LOI Finalist

Ishma Darmey LOI Finalist

3) Mariana Faerron-Gutierrez (GWLN 2011) – her vision is Making Social Impact One Cup At A Time and is accomplished by helping the coffee bean farmer buying beans at double the Fair Trade price and thereby improving the lives of their families and communities.

Mariana Faerron-Gutierrez LOI Finalist

Mariana Faerron-Gutierrez LOI Finalist

4) Martine Bolsens-Peeterman (GWLN 2012 ) is living her dream through her vision, Scaling Impact through Connectivity.  Today she is GWLN Global Ambassador.  She is the bridge-builder connecting the passion of her peers with resources to accomplish their dreams. I have become an advocate for all of their projects by raising awareness for the work to which they have committed their time, talents, and resources.

Martine Bolsens-Peeterman GWLN Global Ambassador & LOI Finalist

Martine Bolsens-Peeterman GWLN Global Ambassador & LOI Finalist

Whether GWLN alumni are building schools, improving healthcare, eliminating poverty or creating new jobs, each leader is committed to improving the lives of individuals and communities. It is the dedicated work of all GWLN graduates who are making a difference in over 40 countries.  You can learn more about these visionary leaders and about my vision (GWLN 2006), Using Influence and Vision to Inspire the Next Generation of Leaders and Innovators, by going to this link. Profiles of Leaders of Impact

The Power of the GWLN Community

The Power of the GWLN Community

Whether GWLN alumni are building schools, improving healthcare, eliminating poverty or creating new jobs, each leader is committed to improving the lives of individuals and communities. It is the dedicated work of all GWLN graduates who are making a difference in over 40 countries.  You can learn more about these visionary leaders and about my vision (GWLN 2006), Using Influence and Vision to Inspire the Next Generation of Leaders and Innovators, by going to this link. Profiles of Women Of Impact

Celebrating

Celebrating

We are not alone in our quest, joining these great women who are committed to making the world a better place are civic, community, and businesses leaders. Please join us as we find new opportunities to reshape the world for all mankind, one day at a time, one person at a time. We are better together as a community of leaders committed to an enriched, united world for generations to come.

Listening